“I want to provide strong leadership that will encourage more tribes to participate on issues that affect all of Indian country and not sacrifice sovereignty and treaty rights for money.”

via Nativenewsonline.net

Published September 23, 2017

CHEYENNE RIVER SIOUX TRIBAL CHAIRMAN HAROLD FRAZIER THROWS HAT IN RING TO BE PRESIDENT OF NATIONAL CONGRESS OF AMERICAN INDIANS

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via Nativenewsonline.net

Published October 25, 2016

CHEYENNE RIVER SIOUX TRIBE CHAIRMAN HAROLD FRAZIER & PRESIDENT OBAMA MET TO DISCUSS DAKOTA ACCESS PIPELINE

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via Nativenewsonline.net

Published May 20, 2017

CHEYENNE RIVER SIOUX TRIBE CHAIRMAN HAROLD C. FRAZIER GETS RECOGNITION FROM LAKOTA PEOPLE

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QUICK FACTS ABOUT CHAIRMAN HAROLD C. FRAZIER

• His father was the late Sam Frazier and mother Greta Takes The Knife.

• On his father’s side he is a descendant of chief White Horse and Chief War Eagle.

• On his Mother’s side he also comes from Chief White Swan, All of whom are War Chiefs of the Great

   Sioux Nation.

• Chairman Frazier currently resides in White Horse, SD.

• Chairman Frazier’s Fiance is Wanda Dubray

• He is a father to 2 sons Jake and Noah and a daughter named Mariah.

• He also has a grandson named Dylan Samuel Tuttle.

• Chairman Frazier graduated from 8th grade at White Horse Day School and later on graduated from

   Cheyenne Eagle Butte High School.

• Chairman Frazier earned his Associates Degree in Agricultural Business from eastern Wyoming

   College.

• He earned his Bachelor’s Degree in Business Management from the Oglala Lakota College.

SOME ACCOMPLISHMENTS INCLUDE

• Elected to serve on tribal council from 1998-2002

• Served 2000 to 2004 NCAI Great Plains Area Vice President for NCAI

• Elected as Vice Chairman of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe from 2000-2002

• Elected into his first term as Chairman of Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe 2002 – 2006

• Elected for a second term as Chairman Of Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe 2014 - 2018

Harold Frazier

Tribal Chairman

Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe

PH:(605)964-4155

Questions for National Congress of American Indians Presidential Candidates, September 2017

1. Please tell Native News Online readers about your qualifications to be president of the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI).

 

I was born and raised in White Horse, South Dakota.  I come from Chief White Horse, Chief War Eagle, and Chief White Swan tiospaye (family).

 

I earned my Associate Degree in Agricultural Business from Eastern Wyoming College and my Bachelor Degree in Business Management from Oglala Lakota College.  I first began my service to the people in 1998 when I was elected to serve on Tribal Council.  In 2002, I was elected to serve (4 year term) as Chairman for Cheyenne River where I went on to serve as the Great Plains Area Vice-President for NCAI and was honorary Sergeant at Arms for the 2004 Democratic Convention.  I was re-elected in 2014 (4 year term) by the people and also elected to serve as the Great Plains Tribal Chairman’s Association Chairman.

 

In 2016, for the first time in history, I delivered the first ever State of Indian Nations Address at the joint session of the South Dakota Legislature.  Shortly after, I stood at the forefront of protecting the Great Sioux Nation homelands from the Dakota Access Pipeline and impending Keystone XL project.  I work tirelessly to protect indigenous natural resources and preserve treaty rights.  My leadership in the fight to stop Dakota Access Pipeline and Energy Transfers Company brought a world-wide unified front to South Dakota, this alone qualifies me to lead NCAI.

 

2. Why do you want to be president of NCAI?

 

The future of tribal policy during the Trump Administration era hangs in the balance.  We have survived eras of ruin at the hands of Congress and our stories are the foundation of tribal policy and self-determination.  As President, I will continue to preserve government-to-government dealings and remind Congress of our distinct legal standing and unique political status.  I want to be the President of NCAI so I can speak on behalf of all the tribes like our forefathers envisioned when they created NCAI.  This presidency will be used to demand Congress, and the Department of Interior to honor treaty and trust relationships with Indian tribes and consult with tribes before making any decisions on our behalf.

 

I want to be president of NCAI to bring national and international attention to the unmet needs across Indian Country and be the voice behind the Tribes who lost hope in this organization to the point where they find membership unimportant.  I remain true to the original purpose of the organization, and that is to be the unified voice of tribal nations.

 

3. What are three goals you wish to accomplish during your presidency?

 

First, I want to bring all of Indian Country back to NCAI by increasing Tribal and individual membership.  Second, I want to let Indian Country drive NCAI, and initiate ideas and goals that are generated from Tribal Leaders.  Third, I will fight to preserve and enhance our tribal sovereignty and treaty rights by promoting the ideal of never trading treaty rights for political favors, money, or an economic advantage.

 

4. What is your vision for NCAI's future?

 

The vision remains; demand Congress live up to their treaty obligations with Indian Country.  Federally recognized Tribes are growing and developing, it is my vision that each grow to their full potential with strong self-governance structures and justice systems.  A vast majority of tribes have grown from government dependent tribes to self-sustaining, independent tribes, however, there are still tribes across the nation who are struggling to reach that level.  Working together with state, federal and local agencies to combine resources to protect tribal lands and rights is the starting point for effective governance.

 

5. In your opinion, what are the three most important issues facing Indian Country today?

 

a. Budget cuts

b. Clean Water and Environmental Protections

c. Loss of land and culture

 

6. How effective have tribes been interacting with the Trump administration since the inauguration?

 

From a bipartisan perspective, Indian Country has survived centuries of ideologies that come from the White House and Congress.  Our needs remain the same; that is to substantially increase funding for the Bureau of Indian Affairs and Indian Health Service and invest in initiatives that will strengthen support for our children and families.  Many of our nation’s tribes continue to operate in substandard facilities and the Bureau of Indian Education schools are still in desperate need of replacement.

NCAI must be hold Congress and the Trump Administration accountable and responsible for answering for honoring our rights as sovereign nations, and for meeting our moral and legal trust obligations. We need Congress and the President to be committed to the values of respect and partnership to make the state of our nations strong for generations to come.

 

7. Please define tribal sovereignty.

 

The essence of sovereignty is for each tribal government to operate as they choose. Tribal members are citizens of three sovereigns; federal, state, and tribal.  Indian tribes are the third sovereign.  As long as the grass grows and the river flows, our sovereign governments must be rooted in respect.  That respect must come from nation-to-nation as well as from federal officials to elected tribal officials.  Our sovereignty stems from our distinct cultures, values, traditions, and most importantly from the solutions that come from our communities.

 

 

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Paid for by Harold C. Frazier for NCAI President

Address P.O. Box 590 Eagle Butte, SD 57625 Phone (605)964-4155